10 Party Games For Ageplayers

Birthday party? Christmas party? October twenty-eighth party? Every day can be a party day when you’re little! But, supposing you’re planning a party for your little one… what party games should there be? This list might not suit every ageplayer of every age, but anyone who plays between age 3-8 will surely find something they’d like to do on this list (keep scrolling to find the rules)!

10 ageplay party games

  1. Pass the parcel:
    This game is best for: Groups of at least 3 party guests.
    Preparation for grownups: Wrap up a little present, e.g. a chocolate bar or a keychain, then put another present on top of that present, and wrap them up together, so when someone opens the first layer of wrapping paper, they get a present, and when someone else opens the next layer, they get a different present, and so on. Wrap one extra layer with another present inside for each guest coming to the party (if someone can’t make it at the last minute, someone who DOES turn up will get 2 presents). It’s better to have too many presents than not enough!
    How to run the game: Get all the littles to sit in a circle. Put some music on, and hand the present to one of the littles. They have to pass the present around the circle (they’re not allowed to hold on to it for too long). When the music stops, whoever is holding the present at the time gets to unwrap one layer of wrapping paper, and they get a present. As the grownup, you are in control of the music, so it’s up to you to make sure each little gets a present!
  2. Musical chairs:
    This game is best for: Littles who ageplay at 5 or under.
    Preparation for grownups: You’ll need one chair for every little. If you don’t have these, consider playing musical statues (below) instead.
    How to run the game: Put all the chairs in the middle of the room, usually back-to-back, so everyone can walk around them. Put some music on. The littles have to form an orderly line and walk around the chairs. When the music stops, they have to sit down as quickly as possible. The last person to sit down is “out”, and each round, one chair is removed. Then the music starts again and they walk around the chairs again, doing the same thing each time the music stops. This game is better for younger littles (under 5s) whereas musical statues works better for older littles.
  3. Musical statues:
    This game is best for: Littles who ageplay at 5 or older.
    Preparation for grownups: None.
    How to run the game: Ask the littles to clear the space in the room so everyone can walk around the floor. Then put some music on. All the littles have to walk around the room (or hop, or skip) but when the music stops, they have to strike a pose and stand as still as a statue! The last person to stand still gets eliminated each time, and so does anyone who moves, giggles or who forgets to strike a pose. The last person standing gets a prize.
  4. Gift Hunt:
    This game is best for: Parties of fewer than five guests.
    Preparation for grownups: Hide gifts (several for each guest) around the room or rooms where the party will take place. Remember to put them in places where they won’t be spotted until the littles are playing this game (or, if you have another grownup to help, hide the presents while the littles are all distracted with another game). If they’re in gift wrap, then the littles will be able to find them more easily because otherwise they might not know what they’re looking for.
    How to run the game: Ask the littles to line up at one side of the room, and tell them there are presents hidden around the room (you could even give them a basket or a bag to collect the presents). They have to search for the presents until they’ve found them all (you can, of course, give them directions if they really can’t find them).
  5. Daddy says:
    This game is best for: Littles who can follow simple instructions.
    Preparation for grownups: None.
    How to run the game: The littles should all be sitting down in a group. Explain to them that they have to do things when you say “Daddy says”, but not if you don’t say that. So, for example, if you say, “Daddy says… touch your nose” they should touch their noses, but if you just say, “touch your nose” they should not (because you didn’t say “Daddy says” at the start). If any littles don’t do something Daddy says, or they do something that didn’t start with “Daddy says,” they’re “out” of the game and the last little wins (this game can go on, especially with littles who are good at following instructions). Remember that at the end of the game, “Daddy says… that’s the end of the game!” This game can work with one little or lots of littles, and is also fun for obedience training.
  6. Stuck in the mud:
    This game is best for: Littles who have too much energy! You need at least 3 players.
    Preparation for grownups: None.
    How to run the game: One person is “it” and they have to chase the other littles and tag them. If a little gets tagged, they are “stuck in the mud” which means they have to stand with their legs apart and their arms wide (legs need to be wide enough that someone can crawl through them). If the person who is “it” gets every other player “stuck in the mud,” they win, and the last person they tagged gets to be “it” next. But… the other players can “rescue” the players who are “stuck in the mud” at any time during the game, by crawling between their legs to get rid of the mud (logical). Unless you have a very small group, it is unlikely that “it” will win, so decide how long you want the littles to run around for, because this game will keep going forever if you don’t decide to do something else at some point.
  7. Letters in your name:
    This game is best for: Littles with self-discipline.
    Preparation for grownups: None.
    How to run the game: All the littles line up against one side of the room. You call out a letter and if anyone has that letter in their name, they take a step for each time it comes up (e.g. if you said “N,” Nile would take one step and Anne would take two steps). It’s up to you whether they’re allowed to include first, last and middle names (this can lead to some people mysteriously telling you they have middle names that would win at Scrabble). The first person who makes it across the room wins a prize.
  8. The box game:
    This game is best for: Flexible littles.
    Preparation for grownups: None.
    How to run the game: Put a cardboard box (cereal boxes work well) on the floor so all the littles stand around it. Taking turns, each little has to pick up the box without using their hands. Only their feet may touch the floor! But each time someone picks up the box, you must tear some of the card off the top so the box gets smaller each time.
  9. Chinese Whispers:
    This game is best for: Everyone!
    How to run the game: The grownup thinks of a phrase or sentence (a song lyric also works, but make sure it’s not too long. “This is how we do” is about the perfect length. The littles all sit in a circle, then the grownup whispers the phrase to the first little, who has to repeat it to the person next to them (in a whisper), and it goes around the entire circle until the very last person has to tell the group what the phrase was. Usually by the end, even in a small group, the phrase has changed so much that it’s funny.
  10. Sardines:
    This game is best for: Groups of 3 or more.
    How to run the game: It’s sort of like back-to-front hide and seek. One person gets a headstart and they have to go and hide. Everyone else has to look for them, only when someone finds them, they have to stay with them (so eventually, everyone’s jammed in the same place… like sardines). The game ends when the last person finds everyone.

What’s your favorite party game? Let me know in the comments! And if you liked this Top 10 list, check out 10 things littles can do on long car rides!

Lots of love,
Katie xxxx

10 Things Littles Can Do On Long Car Rides

As a little, I know we’re not always patient creatures. I want everything to happen YESTERDAY and that’s especially true when it comes to anything I’m particularly excited about! Car rides, then, are a hotbed of frustration, boredom and over-excitement, not to mention over-tiredness, and the environment of a dull journey with an exciting destination is a breeding ground for temper tantrums.

I went on a long car ride last weekend, and another one the weekend before, while we visited assorted relatives over Easter, and I was SO BORED because we’ve done these journeys, like, 1000 times. Because I like researching stuff, I pulled together a list of things to do during future car rides, and hopefully there’s something here that can keep you occupied when you are going on a long car trip too!

10 things littles can do on long car rides BDSM ageplay adult little girl
10 things littles can do on long car rides. Image/background image: Katie Douglas.

1. I spy. This is the most obvious game you can play on long car rides if you and your grown-up are alone in a car together. The person whose turn it is says “I spy with my little eye, something beginning with…” then they say the first letter of the thing they can see. The other person has to guess what it is. You HAVE to be able to see the thing when you say it (and if your grownup/little has autism/aspergers/another thing affecting their ability to perspective-take, make double sure THEY can see it too)!

2. Sing along CDs. This one didn’t occur to me until I found one of my Disney Princess CDs in the car on a recent car trip. You can do this when you’re driving, too (of course, that’s if you’re grown-up enough to drive).

3. Coloring. This one requires advance planning, because you’ll need some paper or a coloring book, and some pencils or crayons to color with.

4. Counting games. Think of something you keep seeing (or don’t see many of), for example, post boxes, telephone boxes or yellow cars. The person who spots the most telephone boxes (for example) wins. What do you win? That’s between you and your grown-up!!

5. Place names. Someone picks a place-name, and the other person has to say another place-name that starts with the same letter that was the last letter of the previous place-name. E.g. “Edinburgh” “Hartford” “Dartmouth.” If you get stuck, there’s usually helpful signposts outside the car window (or you can look at the map if you’re not driving).

6. Telling a story. You say half a sentence to start a story, and the other person has to say another half of a sentence to continue the story, and you keep going as a story starts to grow. You’re not allowed to use your turn to undo someone else’s half-sentence, though!

7. If you want to do something educational, you could have a spelling bee. This is where one person says a word and the other person has to spell it out loud! How many of us depend on spellcheck in our everyday lives? I like to practice my American words because there’s quite a few differences between UK English and American English. The only problem with this game is that you need a grown-up who is good at spelling. Unfortunately, because I really, really, adore words, I’m better at spelling than my grown-up (he is the first person to say this, which is fine because maths is his thing, whereas I’m barely numerate), and so we don’t play this game as often as I’d like.

8. Have a puppet show. If you are in the car alone together, you could take some toy puppets with you, and you can make up a story with them that your grown-up can listen to (although he/she should probably keep their eyes on the road). If you’re driving, obviously your grown-up can do the puppeteering, but you could still voice one of the characters, or you could maybe ask your grown-up to make up a story for you, using the puppets. It’s like an audiobook but WITH PUPPETS IN YOUR CAR!!

9. Word association. This one can also be a fun way to get to know each other better. One person says a word and the other person has to say the first thing that comes into their head, then the first person has to say whatever come into their head, and so on.

10. A twist on word association that I like to play with a couple of my friends who share my sense of humor and love of words is word disassociation. With this game, someone says a word, and you have to say something that’s nothing to do with it. This one really gets you thinking (and you aren’t allowed to hesitate or the other person wins).

Do you have any other games that you like to play in the car with your grown-up/little? Let me know in the comments!!

Lots of love,
Katie xxxx