10 Things Littles Can Do On Long Car Rides

As a little, I know we’re not always patient creatures. I want everything to happen YESTERDAY and that’s especially true when it comes to anything I’m particularly excited about! Car rides, then, are a hotbed of frustration, boredom and over-excitement, not to mention over-tiredness, and the environment of a dull journey with an exciting destination is a breeding ground for temper tantrums.

I went on a long car ride last weekend, and another one the weekend before, while we visited assorted relatives over Easter, and I was SO BORED because we’ve done these journeys, like, 1000 times. Because I like researching stuff, I pulled together a list of things to do during future car rides, and hopefully there’s something here that can keep you occupied when you are going on a long car trip too!

10 things littles can do on long car rides BDSM ageplay adult little girl
10 things littles can do on long car rides. Image/background image: Katie Douglas.

1. I spy. This is the most obvious game you can play on long car rides if you and your grown-up are alone in a car together. The person whose turn it is says “I spy with my little eye, something beginning with…” then they say the first letter of the thing they can see. The other person has to guess what it is. You HAVE to be able to see the thing when you say it (and if your grownup/little has autism/aspergers/another thing affecting their ability to perspective-take, make double sure THEY can see it too)!

2. Sing along CDs. This one didn’t occur to me until I found one of my Disney Princess CDs in the car on a recent car trip. You can do this when you’re driving, too (of course, that’s if you’re grown-up enough to drive).

3. Coloring. This one requires advance planning, because you’ll need some paper or a coloring book, and some pencils or crayons to color with.

4. Counting games. Think of something you keep seeing (or don’t see many of), for example, post boxes, telephone boxes or yellow cars. The person who spots the most telephone boxes (for example) wins. What do you win? That’s between you and your grown-up!!

5. Place names. Someone picks a place-name, and the other person has to say another place-name that starts with the same letter that was the last letter of the previous place-name. E.g. “Edinburgh” “Hartford” “Dartmouth.” If you get stuck, there’s usually helpful signposts outside the car window (or you can look at the map if you’re not driving).

6. Telling a story. You say half a sentence to start a story, and the other person has to say another half of a sentence to continue the story, and you keep going as a story starts to grow. You’re not allowed to use your turn to undo someone else’s half-sentence, though!

7. If you want to do something educational, you could have a spelling bee. This is where one person says a word and the other person has to spell it out loud! How many of us depend on spellcheck in our everyday lives? I like to practice my American words because there’s quite a few differences between UK English and American English. The only problem with this game is that you need a grown-up who is good at spelling. Unfortunately, because I really, really, adore words, I’m better at spelling than my grown-up (he is the first person to say this, which is fine because maths is his thing, whereas I’m barely numerate), and so we don’t play this game as often as I’d like.

8. Have a puppet show. If you are in the car alone together, you could take some toy puppets with you, and you can make up a story with them that your grown-up can listen to (although he/she should probably keep their eyes on the road). If you’re driving, obviously your grown-up can do the puppeteering, but you could still voice one of the characters, or you could maybe ask your grown-up to make up a story for you, using the puppets. It’s like an audiobook but WITH PUPPETS IN YOUR CAR!!

9. Word association. This one can also be a fun way to get to know each other better. One person says a word and the other person has to say the first thing that comes into their head, then the first person has to say whatever come into their head, and so on.

10. A twist on word association that I like to play with a couple of my friends who share my sense of humor and love of words is word disassociation. With this game, someone says a word, and you have to say something that’s nothing to do with it. This one really gets you thinking (and you aren’t allowed to hesitate or the other person wins).

Do you have any other games that you like to play in the car with your grown-up/little? Let me know in the comments!!

Lots of love,
Katie xxxx

10 Real Life Facts About Her Daddy and Her Master

Here are the facts behind my latest novel Her Daddy and Her Master. I thought I’d do another one of these because the one about Mastered by the Highlanders went down so well.

  1. The bathrooms in Her Daddy and Her Master were inspired by Japanese bathrooms. The Japanese have definitely cornered the market on awesome bathroom design, while in the North of England, where I’m currently at grad school, my house (like, where I live right now) still has an outdoor toilet! It gets full of spiders and I hate cleaning it so very much. The big advantage of the outhouse is when Fed-Ex or Parcel Force have a delivery to make, they can leave it in there if I’m not home. I kinda fell in love with this house when I saw it because it looks a bit like Shrek’s swamp home, which I find endearing. I hope when I come to sell the place, the new owners think that’s a good thing too!
  2. Pombos is based on the industrial north of England during the 20th century. A lot of people think this sort of landscape vanished when 1900 came around, but in the North, the world still looked like this when I was a child, the only difference was there were laws about how much smoke a factory could put out. My stepdad, his parents and his sister all worked in a factory like this when I was growing up. Pombos was particularly inspired by some of LS Lowry’s pictures:
    Coming From The Mill by LS Lowry. Source: Wikimedia Commons (CC BY).
    Coming Home From The Mill by LS Lowry, 1928. Source: Wikimedia Commons (CC BY).

    Returning From Work, LS Lowry, 1929. Source: Wikimedia Commons (CC BY).
    Returning From Work, LS Lowry, 1929. Source: Wikimedia Commons (CC BY).
  3. The Great Gig is inspired by a song on the album The Dark Side of The Moon by Pink Floyd. The full title of the song is The Great Gig in The Sky but in my story, it’s a spaceship, and it sort of goes without saying that it’s in the sky, so I shortened it. A gig is also a type of vehicle, so the whole thing sort of fitted.
  4. The adult baby store was an imagining of what all the online stores for ABDL and ageplay stuff (for example, my favorite ageplay store, Little for Big, or the currently-closed furniture store, Adult Baby Apparels) would look like, if any of them had a physical store. Since the story was set in the future, I tried to think about how things like cribs and sippy cups might have changed in the future, as well as how things might have been inspired by other cultures on different planets.
  5. The Innovation Suites were, of course, inspired by the Holodecks from Star Trek: The Next Generation.
  6. Flin was partly inspired by a very good friend who sadly died unexpectedly back in September. I miss them every day, and I hope they approve.
  7. The belt that Flin fastens around Laila to hold the vibrators inside her during one of her punishments was based on female chastity belts that are available. The way Flin used it on Laila, however, was anything but chaste. There don’t seem be many for sale online at the moment and this one from Lovehoney was the closest I could find. I like to imagine that 300 years into the future, such things will be comfortable and readily available, and that there will be lots of versions to buy.
  8. The balls that Flin puts inside Laila are called Ben Wa balls and you can buy them in most online adult stores. This is an example from Lovehoney.
  9. The way the ship stops is based on my experience as a crew member on yachts and narrowboats. I remember the first time I was moving an engine powered boat, when I was fifteen (how I ended up on a boat that day is a whole different story); I pulled away from the jetty, then I panicked a little, as we headed too fast toward the boats on the other side of the marina. Scared of crashing and sinking, I asked, “Where’s the brakes?” Just in time, the man who owned the boat stepped in and showed me what to do. That was when I learned that boats don’t actually have brakes, you have to put them into reverse to make them stop. It was probably really obvious to the rest of the world, but never mind. I decided that spaceships would probably have to do the same, since they wouldn’t be able to drift to a halt in space.
  10. The tea party (if you haven’t read that far yet, I won’t spoil it for you) was based on The Mad Hatter’s Tea Party in Alice in Wonderland.

    The mad hatter's tea party from Disney's version of Lewis Carroll's Alice In Wonderland. Source: Disney wikia.
    The mad hatter’s tea party from Disney’s version of Lewis Carroll’s Alice In Wonderland. Source: Disney Wikia.

Her Daddy and Her Master is out now (click here to read a steamy excerpt), published by Stormy Night Publications, and is available at Amazon, Barnes and Noble, iTunes and more!